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“Even when you think you have your life all mapped out, things happen that shape your destiny in ways you might never have imagined.” -Deepak Chopra

HeavenYesterday, an opinion commentary I submitted to the Denver Post was rejected. His words were, “Thank you for your submission. We’re going to pass on this one.” That’s it. No other comment. I suspect this is a reflection of the management’s view. I’m slightly exasperated that opposing views would not be presented for people to make their own informed decisions about laws that affect us.

This brings up a greater issue I tried to avoid addressing in my last blog essay, but I cannot avoid it any longer. For many in our culture, accepting death is taboo. Perhaps it is considered a failure in a culture where might is idealized and vulnerability considered weakness. In order to understand that the opposite is actually true, a paradigm shift needs to occur, culturally. As each person awakens to the truth that death is a natural part of life, ideologies will change. War and destruction of the planet will be incomprehensible. Everybody does not have to shift their consciousness, merely reaching a critical mass will be sufficient.

What is holding this revolution back is fear. Perhaps this fear is caused by wanting to avoid the grief of losing a loved one. Perhaps it is the fear of facing one’s own mortality, letting go of the personality into the numinous. Being in my situation, I can clearly see that this fear keeps people from understanding the continuity and interconnectedness of the soul. Courage is what nearly everyone will have to summon when they are in the dying process. Kathleen Singh wrote a brilliant book titled Grace In Dying where she described the stage of panic and despair being just prior to the stage of transcendence. What keeps people from understanding the continuity of the soul, I believe, is a lack of courage, or cowardice. Wikipedia’s definition:

Cowardice is a trait wherein fear and excess self-concern override doing or saying what is right, good and of help to others or oneself in a time of need—it is the opposite of courage. As a label, “cowardice” indicates a failure of character in the face of a challenge.

My commentary was a rebuttal of the now minority held belief that people should not have the right to choose when to end their pain and suffering when they are in the dying process. The anti-right to choose group Not Dead Yet’s perspective was presented in a previous commentary. I presented point by point a rebuttal. Obviously, the Denver Post is biased.

I recently interacted with some state representatives and state senators in a respectful and interactive way. Personally, I am not near the need to consider these choices mentally, emotionally or spiritually, but physically I am extremely vulnerable. If faced with this choice, I’m not sure what I would choose for myself. Everybody has different thresholds for what they can bear. If I got pneumonia again, that would be my threshold. I’m not interested in drowning to death in my own fluids. That would be my moment to call in hospice for palliative care and to hasten my final transition. Having the option to lessen needless suffering for myself and my family would give me great comfort.

What I truly believe is what Rabindranath Tagor succinctly said: “Death is not extinguishing the light; it is putting out the lantern because the dawn has come.”

When the majority of our culture accepts this, there will be much less violence and suffering in the world, much more peace and compassion. Making peace with our final passage can happen at any time in our living or dying process. After all, we are all merely returning Home.

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