You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Freedom’ tag.

You are a drop and God is the ocean. Just allow yourself to fall back into it. – Michael Brown

Healing means different things to different people. For some people, healing means that the body ceases to have physical symptoms that were causing discomfort. Once they heal physically, they may choose to inspire others who are suffering. Healing on this level can bring physical and emotional relief and inspiring others can be a valuable contribution. Many of us experience this level of healing, frequently.

Some people who heal physically also heal mentally (thoughts) and spiritually. They often have a broader story of healing to model and to teach others.

Some Self-selected individuals may have taken on challenging curricula in order to heal personally and to accelerate their soul family’s journey, called soul contracts. (Many are not aware of this consciously, but that doesn’t negate the likelihood.) Often these people heal mentally and spiritually, but not physically. Myself and, I suspect, many people I know with progressive, incurable illnesses have chosen these rigorous paths while in Spirit. Not for the faint of heart, these distinct teachings can reduce the emphasis on of the ego in the physical world, if embraced with awareness. Our personalities are egocentric and limiting our identification with the ego can open doors to the numinous. In my experience, the more catastrophic my curriculum has been, the more liberating. Living this curriculum with grace can spread these teachings through the collective, to the seen and unseen worlds.

Occasionally, I come across others who appear to have similar curricula for whom I feel an instant kinship on an intuitive level. Marc Stecker, AKA Wheelchair Kamikaze, a fellow blogger, profound in his scope, humor, and development over time, is one such individual. If interested, you would do well to follow his blog.

Some healers who have healed physically, mentally, and spiritually have developed their own processes to help bring the collective forward in our development toward finding peace in our lives. One such teacher is Michael Brown, who I have spoken of in previous blog essays, because I find his work profound. Fellow psychotherapists/colleagues have used The Presence Process with their clients to deepen their therapeutic work. He has many YouTube videos along with his book to guide people through his teachings.

Michael often uses different parables and sacred Stories in his teachings similar to the stories disseminated by indigenous cultures. Here is one of my favorites:

He teaches about the three stories we tell ourselves. The first story, is of the “bad” one—about our damage, our victimization and how this shaped us—even how it might have driven us to doing some good things in the world, but how we were driven by the ghosts of our childhood or loss of parent figure [literally or figuratively, perhaps searching for the nurturing (mother) or direction (father) we’d never had], at some juncture, to enter the world in search of the missing parent in the external world. That’s the first story.

The second story is the flip side of the “bad”–it’s the “good” story of what we found on our search for our missing mother or father figure and how when we got down to the bottom of it—the details of the story dropped away and we met this energy inside, not outside of ourselves—and we felt a foundation of self-love at last.

The third story includes his spin on the word “Legend”—-he says after living the “good” and “bad” stories in a lot of fullness, we are completely freed from the history of those—we don’t carry the wounds in the same way, we don’t organize our waking moments around the same obstacles or false longings—and everything is different and we aren’t questing in the same sense—instead we just enjoy being as we symbolically stand on the ledge of our life, on the very end of the ledge of our life. And then we step off—and we live our own ” ledge-end.” We are free to define ourselves, our work, our resources, our abundance, our relations—in any way we want that serves this open-endedness we have stepped into.

When we are in our “bad” or “good” stories, there is work to do that can be grueling, because we must feel the grief of each story fully.

We each have our curriculum that is sacred and perfect for our lifework. From healing the issues with our mothers, or those who may be a surrogate for mother, we learn to nurture ourselves. From healing the issues with our fathers, we understand our perspective on God, the Divine, the Source of Universal Love. To do this, we must pass through the illusion of separation Stephen Levine described it well when he called it, “learning to opening your heart in hell.”

Whether we access this Knowing now or later in our development, our Beloveds have entered an agreement with us, soul to soul, for the well-being of all. And it is through this level of awareness of the soul, beyond the ego, that opening our hearts in hell is possible and finding peace can be a true reality.

Advertisements

The higher we soar, the smaller we appear to those who cannot fly. – Frederick Nietzsche

There are times I feel on the periphery of life, that life is an illusion, and not feeling a part of it is, perhaps, less illusory. I’ve heard the theory that our dream life is more real than our waking life. Much of the time, I feel I am living in a liminal state on the threshold of a great adventure.

On the other hand, sitting in my chair twenty-two hours a day, does not preclude me from experiencing a vital and extraordinary life. I thoroughly enjoy the care and relationship with my caregivers, family, and friends. They know how important they are to me and how much I love them. They also know that I love my alone time. I tell them, I love when you come and I love when you go. This statement often relieves any concern they might have about leaving me alone, as I add, I am good company.

Some of my time is spent connecting with people online, supporting people experiencing grief, change, or even perilous challenges in their lives. I enjoy listening to podcasts, my friends’ blogs, archival news programs, or advocating for the latest issue I feel passionate about contacting senators, congressmen, or other officials. I call my chair command central.

The fly can survive the harshest living conditions and still manage to feed, grow, and breed. It is one tough survivor and plays a vital role in the cycle of life. Sometimes I feel like a fly on the wall of life. Often there is sadness when I cannot connect with my family when desired or when I feel out of sync with their lives. If I could fly and visit them on the East  Coast and share their lives, that might be a different story. Recently, I read a book by Robert Monroe titled, Journey Out of the Body, published in 1971, about the author experimenting with separating from his physical body. He was a scientist and took meticulous, contemporaneous notes. When he finally achieved his goal, his hand went through the wall feeling multiple layers of texture until he was on the other side of the wall and could journey freely without the encumbrance of his physical body.

Lately, when I think of myself as a fly on the wall, instead of feeling like there is a wall between myself and others, this wall is beginning to thin, to become permeable. It feels more like a portal, a sacred threshold leading to a sense of freedom I have never felt before in this lifetime. Intuitively, I just know on the other side of the wall is an expanded space of connection and love.

When I was a child, I used to have flying dreams. I could leap from building to building. Flying dreams are common, but often diminish through our lives. I wonder if, as one nears the end of one’s life, these dreams reawaken. Perhaps there is a Knowing that’s getting evoked, like recovering a memory.

People ask me how I could possibly feel so calm, so accepting of my physical circumstance. I sometimes sense a recollection of plans made prior to this lifetime. They are not vivid memories, but more allegorical. The feeling that I am in exactly the right place, doing exactly the right thing, is quite literal.

It is, perhaps, this knowing that gives me the peace and calm that is perceived by others and it is, perhaps, this Knowing that forms a bridge from this reality of matter to the numinous.

Soon enough I will get my wings and fly away from this beautiful life, this identity, this extraordinary curriculum I have so dearly cherish. And in that Knowing, I have no doubt I will assist my loved ones from the other side and be like a fly on the wall, ever persistent and ever present.

I ain’t afraid to love a man. I ain’t afraid to shoot him either. – Annie Oakley

We are the authors of our lives. We write our own daring endings. We craft love from heartbreak, compassion from shame, grace from disappointment, courage from failure. – Brene Brown, PhD

What a gift human life is with all its challenges and opportunities for liberation through adversity; as a snake needs a rock to rub against to remove the old skin, humans need ordeals to evolve. It is through adversity that humanity acquirers empathy, increasing its capacity for love. This is one of humanity’s deepest teachings. Love is. Anything in the way of that knowing is, I believe, what we are here to learn from and transform, to turn lead into gold, poison into medicine.

Living a human life is not for the faint of heart. If we dig deeply enough, most of us live with an insidious amount of unworthiness, or shame, imprinted during childhood whether this imprint is conscious or not to our adult selves. In my opinion, one of our greatest accomplishments during our lifetime is to chip away at this shame – the belief that in our core we do not matter or are in some way deeply flawed, that if someone gets close enough, this secret will be revealed. Often this imprint gets projected outwardly as a defense against feeling the unworthiness that dwells in our beliefs about ourselves, the unknown hitchhikers in our individual personas that wreak havoc in our personal lives. With such a belief operating in our core, intimacy, with ourselves and others, can become difficult to allow. It is through intimate relationships that healing takes an accelerated path and poison can become medicine.

Our most unlikely, yet beneficial, allies during our lifetimes are the ones who, often unknowingly, take us into that core, the faulty foundation where untruths mold our beliefs just waiting to be transformed. Of course, we don’t see these messengers as great teachers at first, but over time as we develop the capacity for self-reflection and often through grueling repetition we begin to experience a level of liberation. In my experience, it is only when I am able to feel the shame completely, without turning away, that self-love is restored. This ability may be unreachable for some people, but I believe this is the hope for humanity.

My husbands have been the Trojan horses that provided the grit necessary to take me into the deep, recurring, faulty beliefs that caused me tremendous suffering. They exposed these beliefs often unconsciously and sometimes with cruelty. Learning to not shoot the messenger was key to taking responsibility for my childhood imprints and finding liberation. Often we can become distracted by trying to derail the messenger, in an attempt to invalidate the message, propagating an illusion that we can somehow avoid feeling the shame. Developing the capacity to sit with the pain of “not enough,” is the only way to release its hold over us. To do so requires practice, increasing empathy toward the self, and not taking what seems to be criticism from others, personally.

To look at these messengers with equanimity, we realize they are doing us a great service. I believe the messengers can become more harsh if we resist the greater teachings. This is not to be confused with being victimized by another’s unskillful projections. Discernment is necessary to courageously unwrap the projections and determine what is the grain of truth that is useful for one’s liberation. Multiple marriages can be seen in this culture as a failure, but people are changing quickly and one cannot determine what others might require. Each of my three marriages has been like a different incarnation, one building upon the previous. What ever brings awareness is exactly what is needed by the determined soul. After all, you cannot heal what you do not acknowledge. By my second marriage, seeing the repetitive patterns, I understood that I was the common denominator. Once aware of the pattern, I could choose – shame or self-love.

I have had communications in the last months with all three previous husbands to varying degrees of connectedness. My first husband I call my greatest teacher, because he was creative, intelligent, and brutal in his younger years. In my 30s and while in therapy, it had become apparent that I had embraced a level of victim mentality. With his help and my courage, determination, and a lot of therapy I was able to release myself from the grips of this insidious form of self-hatred. Not everyone needs this level of intervention, but I had been a willful child and not able to change, otherwise. An identity of victim is one of the most excruciating forms shame can take. When embraced with empathy, this pattern can be transformed to self-love. Recently, my daughter asked me to contact her father, my first husband. Over the years, I have forgiven his hurtful behavior and begun to see him as soul family, someone who had agreed to provide this ordeal out of love, to bring us forward in our evolution. I know, this is a generous shift in beliefs, but if one could choose our perceptions, why would anyone choose otherwise? Because of this shift in my perception, he was able to tell me that he loved me, he had always loved me, and he will always love me. Intuitively, I knew this, but the medicine this acknowledgment brought to myself and my daughter was immeasurable.

Shame is an insidious poison that can rob us of our birthright to feel loved and loving in a Universe where Love is the only Truth.

StephanieStephanie–the Way of the Bodhisattva**

On Sunday, my dear friend Stephanie left her body after a lifetime of illness and activism. She developed a worldwide network to support people with PJS, or Peutz–jeghers syndrome, a genetic birth anomaly that often leads to cancer.

Stephanie was an AIDS and cancer activist, a natural death proponent, and an educator, encouraging living life to the fullest, no matter one’s circumstances or longevity.

Stephanie reached out to me more than a year ago after reading all the archives of my blog, no small feat. Stephanie heard deeply the themes in my essays. She recommended readings including academic papers to support my theories. Stephanie met me where I was and this is one of her many gifts to humanity.*

Three days before Stephanie left her body, she wrote to me, “I love this time of grace when I turn from this world toward a bigger world where I live now. I am giving up my computer to move toward God and moving closer toward the door called death.”

Stephanie said goodbye and encouraged me to shift my attention when I am ready to make this journey. Always the teacher, always the lover of life.

We connected in our love of life and of helping humanity in whatever way we could. We recognized kindred spirits and we were amazed at the depth of love we shared in this unconventional, cyber way.

Godspeed, Stephanie and I will see you in a flash.

* If you would like hear an audio interview of Stephanie, http://tns.commonweal.org/podcasts/stephanie-sugars/#.WDRk66PMyYU

**She has carried many and now she is being carried. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzPTHstpJ2I

Here is a video made by Stephanie’s friends: https://youtu.be/JaaNVKIsffQf

Stephanie“Death is a wardrobe change.” -Pete Bernard

Dearest Stephanie,

I was so happy to hear from you from your hospice (!) after my last blog essay. I know you cannot interact with me the way you would like to. I miss that and I will grieve. What else can we do?

I don’t know how you found me, but I do know why. I will listen for you in the wind and hear you in my heart. You are so generous with your offerings. And I know you will be, forever.

Write if you can. I will be listening.

When you can no longer connect with me, I will see you on the other side . Thank you for all the articles and your loving support.

I will love you always, Aliyah

 

Stephanie Sugars is a beautiful, survivor of Life who has had metastatic cancer for nearly twenty-five years. She has been a lifelong activist, perennial teacher and has, in the last year, become my friend.

Stephanie reached out to me nearly a year ago with much support, identification and empathy for my challenges, with so much love. She is a proponent of natural death and she is presently, with the support of hospice, teaching by example.
http://www.pushinglimits.i941.net/?p=488

“We never face death unless death unequivocally faces us.” -Christine Longacre

Freedom three

As many of my friends and readers know about me, power has been a significant, rigorous teacher in my life. I believe we are here to work on a particular life lesson or lessons during our lifetimes. For me, the struggle between trusting my own power and abdicating my power has been a recurring theme that shaped my sense of self and ultimately formed my emotional and spiritual well-being. Ignoring these teachings had catastrophic effects on my psyche which led to profound anxiety and depression. Much like playing the childhood game with my brother, “You’re getting warmer, you’re getting colder…” the symptoms shaped a more powerful me. Eventually, abdicating my power began to manifest very subtly in my physical body, where I could no longer ignore it.

Perhaps the source of this illness is arbitrary and abdication of power is not the pernicious cause I suspect, but, regardless, I am in the end-stage of a degenerative, neurological illness which has rendered me unable to move any muscle below my neck. Eating meals results in choking and aspirating which indicates the need for a feeding tube, or gastrostomy if one is to prolong life.

My first professional job was to set up a social service program in a children’s home for profoundly disabled children, facing the end of their lives. These children were given blended foods forced directly into their stomachs with a syringe. They could not taste the foods and also could not object. These were the choices of the medical establishment made in concert with the families in the 70s. I have chosen to not have a feeding tube. There is no right or wrong. In my opinion, the power to choose is not just a right, but necessary for the liberation of my soul. Autonomy has always been important to me; I found my power and my voice by exercising my own right to make my own choices.

Another potentially life-threatening symptom is weakness of my core muscles, resulting in shallow breathing and accelerated heart rate. I choose to live at 8000 feet altitude, despite the breathing difficulties. Again, my choice. It may not be the choice of others, but we live in a pluralistic society of diversity. It is important for me to honor other people’s choices as well as my own. Elimination is another bodily function I cannot perform on my own. Other people’s choices may include a colostomy. I choose to draw a line where others might make other choices for themselves. Isn’t that everybody is right?

My hometown is aesthetically beautiful and offers a caring, intimate community that will accommodate my specific needs, being housebound and bedridden. As a psychotherapist, my love of group dynamics can manifest in this caring, progressive community. I participate in or lead nine groups per month from my chair I call “command central.” Quality of life is more important to me than quantity. My family understands this about me and they are supportive. Ironically, when I was a competitive athlete with many blue ribbons, I never felt as powerful as I do now despite being unable to move a muscle.

A wave of options is moving through the country, state by state. In Colorado it is called the Colorado End-of-life Options Act which has been sensitively and thoughtfully crafted. Organizations that oppose this movement consider these options to be assisted suicide. In suicide, the person wants to die. Assisted suicide is illegal and will continue to be illegal. In my profession, I “talked people off the ledge,” which I was extremely successful doing; you just had to show them some hope. With a terminal illness, people want to live, but death is imminent. In order to qualify, the bill requires two different physicians to assess that the individual will likely die within six months. There is a fear that coercion could be a concern. If one physician suspects coercion or an inability for the person to make an informed decision for themselves, a referral is made to a licensed mental health professional for counseling. In my opinion, patients vulnerable to coercion by family members will unfortunately have that dynamic regardless of the increased options available. A hospice or care team, led by the physician should know the patient well enough to provide the necessary protocols to support the individual and family at this vulnerable time. The end-of-life option is for the purpose of lessening pain and suffering at the end of one’s life by prolonged, ineffective Herculean medical efforts.

I have seen families devastated and overwhelmed by the pressure to prolong their loved one’s life, but instead end up prolonging their pain and suffering which, in fact, diminishes their quality of life. These families have been devastated by the unnecessary medical treatments, literally torturing their loved ones while they take their last breaths in agony. I do not choose this for myself, my family or my loved ones.

From what I understand about the trajectory of my illness, my life will end with either suffocation from choking, sepsis from pressure sores or pneumonia. I have executed a DNR that precludes hospitalization for these circumstances, however each will involve tremendous suffering for myself or loved one. The Colorado End of life Options Act would provide comfort and empowerment during my final transition. No one is required to use this option, but everyone deserves the right. Support our politicians to vote yes on HB 16 – 024 and SB 16 – 1054 and let our last breath be  taken with love and peace.

 

“Joy is something deeper than a feeling. Joy is a gift deep within. It cannot be rocked by the sound of an alarm clock or by pain.” –Elise Charbonnet Anglette (Casey’s beloved childhood friend fiercely confronting aggressive breast cancer with her husband and 6 beloved youngens. Google her, she will change your life.)

5 Days in the Life of an Addict:*

Day 1– I walk down the street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I fall in. I feel lost… I feel helpless. It isn’t my fault! I’m not responsible. It takes forever to find a way out.
Day 2– I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I and I don’t see it. I fall in again. I can’t believe I’m back in the same place. But it isn’t my fault. I don’t feel responsible. It takes a long time to get out.
Day 3– I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I see it is there. I still fall in… it’s a habit. But my eyes are open, I know where I am. It is my fault. I am responsible. I get out very quickly.
Day 4– I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I walk around it.

Day 5– I walk down a different street. This parable is profound when we take it in deeply. I will discuss this more later.   ~Author unknown

 *Note: Addict, to me is anyone who is in a human body. My favorite definition of addiction is anything that is between you and God or Source.
by Kathryn Greene Brady

by Kathryn Green Brady

 

In the afterlife and near-death experience communities it is almost cliché to talk about life review, but for the initiated, life review is an essential part of returning to the Spirit world, our true and eternal Home. For those who have had near-death experiences or NDEs life review is a way of integrating the work of the lifetime just completed. It is a time to assess the work done, how it was done, what is still to be learned and more. During this time, our guides and ascended Masters meet us in loving collaboration. During that time, from what I have read and experienced in meditation, there is no judgment. The only judgment we experience is our own internal remorse that we may carry. From what I understand, there is only unconditional love at Home. It is coming to this Earth school in human bodies where judgment is experienced.

Having this long-term, intractable illness has allowed for an elongated process of life review for which I have received much assistance. I have gratitude for all the support I have received throughout my life which has allowed me to be of help to others. Receiving help and helping had gone hand-in-hand. I have much gratitude for my helpers along my journey, both incarnate and discarnate. Without the assistance and my openness to that assistance I would have been much less helpful to others. So for my helpers, my openness and helpees, I am deeply grateful.

The hole represents a questioning of whether this illness was necessary or whether it caused needless harm to myself and/or my loved ones. Just entering the latter thought makes my stomach turn with grief and anxiety. That is my hole. In a totally open, vulnerable moment in my life I acknowledged to a beloved teacher, while practically on my knees in a proverbial sense, that, “I want to give more than I take while in this life.” I had never consciously thought about this, but it came from the deepest part of my heart and soul. Likewise, it reveals my deepest vulnerability, that perhaps I did not fulfill this prayer, this deep yearning.

This inner questioning has provided an opportunity to explore the value of this illness in my life. It has stimulated a deep exploration that has required much meditation and dreamtime; this process has yielded much benefit. I cry with deep gratitude as I describe this sacred process. And this is what I have learned thus far:

One of my newest helpers, a shamanic practitioner, while in trance acknowledged that I, in fact, did not have to have this illness which triggered much emotional material for me to grapple with. Ironically, I found myself in the very hole the author described in the parable above. I was humbled to see that the hole is still a vulnerable place for me. I was both appreciative and humbled to have this opportunity to revisit this vulnerability, mostly because when I leave, I want to be as complete as I am able.

Not much is in my way of a conscious, liberating transition into Freedom. That is what I am going toward; that is what we are all going for. In my opinion, any vulnerability can be an obstacle toward this freedom. And obstacles are places where deeper self-love can be cultivated.

In the parable, it occurs to me that this illness afforded me the opportunity to become adept at traversing Day 4. I can now see the hole and perhaps even walk around it. Maybe I have not walked down a different street, which may represent a life with perfect health, but a lifetime perfecting Day 4 is pretty damn awesome. I can know that I will no longer get lost in this hole of my ego’s creation. How liberating it is that?!

So thank you my Beloveds, my helpers, my helpees. As I tell my children, I will still be connecting and sharing. You just have to become better listeners.

“It’s the stuff God hits your ass with, when he doesn’t want to kill ya, he just wants to slow ya down.” -Richard Pryor on MS

Leanne_Spiritual_Heart.341200433_stdI believe that people take on catastrophic challenges for different reasons, because in our deepest Being, we want to wake up; we want to evolve and we want to effect the collective evolution of humanity. That is not small potatoes. Otherwise, the Universe would be seen as an uncompromising, sadistic force, which I do not, cannot and will not ever believe; that is too antithetical to what I feel in my heart. Without my cumulative felt-perceptions nurtured over many decades and perhaps many lifetimes, I might have the consciousness of a chickpea, not meaning to disparage a chickpea. Sorry Rumi.

My belief system has been nurtured by my evolving love for myself and humanity. How could this curriculum be for anything but my betterment? When I feel moved to look deeper into the etiology of the illness I feel like an investigator looking for clues. Either we volunteer for these rigorous curricula or they are arbitrary, the latter of which I don’t believe for a minute given the outcomes I have witnessed and experienced. I also believe that we set up reminders along the way when we might be deviating from our chosen course. At these points, like breadcrumbs along the path, we face crossroads where free choice can be exercised to alter the trajectory.

I can remember making choices during my life that, in retrospect, were not in my best interest. Rather than seeing these choices as failures or even tests that would imply right or wrong, I see these moments as opportunities for my Soul to catch my attention. Based on the curricula chosen by the Soul, these nudges are instructive and they become louder and louder when ignored.

Working on surrendering my egoic willfulness, I suspect that I created a failsafe plan to get my attention that would not allow for error. Early in the illness, I felt punished and ashamed. Now I understand that the opposite is really true. Because I am a courageous soul with fierce determination, I set out a curriculum where surrender was the only option.

I can remember example after example of times in my life when I deferred my own judgment to other people’s opinions. I can remember denying my own intuitions and desires to meet other people’s needs. The most representative example of this self injurious behavior was after a marital separation where I was left emotionally devastated. It took two days to get myself out of bed and back to work, after six weeks of singing Amazing Grace for an hour each day while driving over the causeway to New Orleans, I gradually brought my life back to a place of joyful homeostasis. I began to dream of finding a small house for myself and the children that was only mine.

When my husband sensed my joy he requested  a reconciliation, I pivoted away from my dream to reconcile. I began having anxiety attacks like I had never experienced. I remember being unable to leave the car, but still I ignored them. In retrospect, these felt like wake-up calls that I systematically ignored. What could my soul do, but make the alarms louder? That was when the symptoms were beginning. But it is never just one incident; there are often many unheeded calls. Remember, the illnesses or injuries are not punishments. They are sacred breadcrumbs to assist your return to your chosen path.

Around this time the symptoms had begun. Instead of abandoning my dream, I needed to turn toward my dream, to empower it, to empower myself. Only in retrospect do it realize the significance of ignoring the prompting from my soul. I gave my soul no choice but to intensify the constriction. This was a loving gesture, like a parent creating instructive containment to assure healthy development in their child. There is no judgment regarding the required curriculum on a Soul level. Challenges and resulting behaviors are met with neutrality. What is most important is the return to a deeper sense of self-love. “God does not want to kill ya, just slow ya down.”

People design specific karmic lessons during their pre-birth planning to focus on developing particular traits, i.e. self-esteem, generosity, compassion, becoming more self-referential during their mortal lifetimes. I believe that becoming self-referential was central to my learning and being willful was in the way of making better choices that would deepen self trust. Okay, enter progressive degenerative illness  to affirm to my ego that my soul is in charge. From the perspective of this singular life, it seems like a big deal, but from the scope of thousands of lifetimes it is a mere speck in the bigger picture.

The hope and promise of a life fully lived brings with it the perspective of seeing our lives from the bigger picture perspective. With this understanding, suffering can be greatly reduced and deep joy and satisfaction attained from the knowing that we have done our best. It is for this intended outcome that I continue to log my Journey.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” -Margaret Mead

Vector illustration of a man in jailI watched a powerful documentary titled Serving Life, narrated by Forest Whitaker. It was filmed in Angola prison, one of the most violent prisons in the US. The Warden decreased the violence by 70% by infusing humanity into convicted murderers and sex offenders. He instituted a hospice program where the felons, acting as surrogate families, took care of each other through their final passage. Their lives were no longer focused on the life they took, but the life they served making his transition.

The closest I got to Angola penitentiary was hiking outside the prison. I have always had a difficult time being in the dense, impacted energy of prisons. I had a student intern who was placed at a local prison. My denial regarding sociopathic personality disorders rendered me vulnerable to their manipulation; prisons were not safe to my psyche. My student introduced me to interesting personalities within that particular system. One such sociopath would wait for a person to walk by his prison cell and ejaculate through the keyhole. His aim was impeccable and a message was clearly delivered. I was out of my element within the prison walls.

It would be a few years before I became initiated to finally accept the intransigence of the sociopathic personality disorder. This excruciating process was described in a previous blog entry titled Dancing With the Devil.

My first male psychotherapist named Ken had spent many years in a maximum security prison until he had systematically taken down the internal walls around his heart and the prison system could not spit him out fast enough. A certain energetic frequency needs to be maintained internally, in order for the external walls to be maintained. Once his vibration raised, his environment needed to change to attain a new equilibrium. It is merely physics.

We create self-imposed prisons based on our internal beliefs and thoughts, which is what determines our energetic frequencies. As we clear the clutter around our minds and hearts, liberation is achieved. From what I have read, which resonates through my Being, we will merge into Unity once we all heal and evolve. The ramifications of this Truth are profound, if we can grasp the reality as our own. It means we all need to help each other. No one can be left behind.

The ones who have lost their way and exhibited predatory behavior are also included in this Whole. When I see the work being done in Angola, the “bloodiest prison in America,”  I can see, without equivocation, that this is possible.